Sapiens with a Twist

All species go extinct eventually

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Middle Pleistocene Human Remains from Tourville-la-Rivière (Normandy, France) and Their Archaeological Context

Abstract: 

Filed under Anthropology Science Human Evolution Humanity PLoS ONE Research Pleistocene Paris France Neanderthals Neandertals Archaeology

2 notes

★★★★☆ Initially, I didn’t think I’d enjoy this book very much; it began sort of like a teenager complaining about cleaning their room, but as the pages went on, it took a strong hold of me. Vanessa Woods paints a vivid, albeit mostly on the surface, image of life in the Congo during some of its most tumultuous years. If you didn’t know anything about the Congo, this book is a decent overview of recent events. Although, as Woods also recommends, reading Adam Hochschild’s King Leopold’s Ghost would provide excellent background information.

For those of us already familiar with primates, this book isn’t anything outstanding. The way in which she introduces and talks about the bonobos will have you occasionally forgetting they aren’t human and you’ll laugh and cry along with them. If you are reading this to learn about bonobos, your time would be better spent reading Frans de Waal’s work with bonobos in captivity. The book isn’t long and I highly recommend it for all primatologists and anthropologists as a leisurely read.

Check it out  here!

★★★★☆ Initially, I didn’t think I’d enjoy this book very much; it began sort of like a teenager complaining about cleaning their room, but as the pages went on, it took a strong hold of me. Vanessa Woods paints a vivid, albeit mostly on the surface, image of life in the Congo during some of its most tumultuous years. If you didn’t know anything about the Congo, this book is a decent overview of recent events. Although, as Woods also recommends, reading Adam Hochschild’s King Leopold’s Ghost would provide excellent background information.

For those of us already familiar with primates, this book isn’t anything outstanding. The way in which she introduces and talks about the bonobos will have you occasionally forgetting they aren’t human and you’ll laugh and cry along with them. If you are reading this to learn about bonobos, your time would be better spent reading Frans de Waal’s work with bonobos in captivity. The book isn’t long and I highly recommend it for all primatologists and anthropologists as a leisurely read.

Check it out here!

Filed under book review bonobo handshake vanessa woods bonobo chimpanzee primatology anthropology non fiction science lola ya bonobo congo democratic republic of the congo

1 note

"you certainly threw Mark Jenner for a loop with your speculation about photoreactions," he said, chuckling. "And Silvia Orloff wasn’t about to let you get away with using Warrua fossils as justification —-"

"I wasn’t trying to justify anything. I just heard something about those fossils, you know, and I was wondering. I didn’t realize it was so controversial."

"She’s right that the evidence is skimpy. It could be a lot of hullabaloo about some symmetrical mineral formations."

"Well, when you think about it… For something as complicated as photosynthetic bacteria to evolve so soon after the Earth —— Garrett!" She turned and looked over her shoulder toward the intersection they’d just floated through. "That was a red light!"

"Yellow. It was yellow when I saw it."

Carbon Dreams by Susan M. Gaines (ch. 2, p. 25)

Hahaha Garrett doesn’t care! Haha

(via thedisgruntledscientist)

Filed under science dialogue carbon dreams funny

302,479 notes








Progress




sources:
Engagdget
DailyTech
CBS

They turned RNA into an anti-virus program. That is amazing.

Let me restate this in case it didn’t sink in the first time
Researchers physically DELETED ALL TRACES of the HIV virus from a human cell.
ALL OF IT.
IF YOU ARE NOT EXCITED ABOUT THAT I DON’T THINK YOU KNOW WHAT HIV IS

I’m not a fan of linking scientific research to non academic news articles and unfortunately that is all that is linked to by the others above. 
———————————————
SOURCES: 
NEWS: Temple University School of Medicine
Temple University Researchers Successfully Eliminate The HIV Virus From Cultured Human Cells For The First Time
RESEARCH: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 
RNA-directed Gene Editing Specifically Eradicates Latent and Prevents New HIV-1 Infection
NOTE: If you can not view the research due to a paywall, please visit here for the PDF. 

Progress

sources:

Engagdget

DailyTech

CBS

They turned RNA into an anti-virus program. That is amazing.

Let me restate this in case it didn’t sink in the first time

Researchers physically DELETED ALL TRACES of the HIV virus from a human cell.

ALL OF IT.

IF YOU ARE NOT EXCITED ABOUT THAT I DON’T THINK YOU KNOW WHAT HIV IS

I’m not a fan of linking scientific research to non academic news articles and unfortunately that is all that is linked to by the others above. 

———————————————

SOURCES: 

NEWS: Temple University School of Medicine

Temple University Researchers Successfully Eliminate The HIV Virus From Cultured Human Cells For The First Time

RESEARCH: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 

RNA-directed Gene Editing Specifically Eradicates Latent and Prevents New HIV-1 Infection

NOTE: If you can not view the research due to a paywall, please visit here for the PDF

(Source: mannysiege, via katie-md)

Filed under HIV Science Biology PNAS Medicine

2 notes

… We wanted to find out what makes humans so smart, what it is that bonobos lack that makes the crucial difference between them and us. But in the end, who would you rather be? In our modern miracle of a world, life is pretty sweet. We can be sipping margaritas in the Caribbean one minute and shopping in Los Angeles the next. When we get bored of real life, we can escape into a book or movie. Everything we need is on the Internet. Even our phones can play music, take photos, and guide us via GPS to our favorite restaurants.

Except that you and I are the lucky ones. More than 80 percent of people live on less than $10 a day. More than 25,000 children die a day from poverty. More than 40 million people have HIV. Since 1945, there have been only 26 days without war. Every year, half a billion people get malaria. More than a billion people have no clean water. Even in America, the land of dreams that I am coming to love as my own, one in ten people lives in poverty.

In the end, if fate is just a roll of the dice and you could be born anywhere, to any family in the world, if you look at the odds, who would you rather be? Most of the time, bonobos have no hunger, no violence, no poverty. And for all our intelligence, all our things, bonobos have the most important of all possessions — peace.

And that is why bonobos are important. Because they hold the key to world without war. We have already learned so much from chimpanzees. Yet our other closest living relative, the one who has no war and lives in peace, we have kept at arm’s length, as strangers.

If we lose bonobos, we will never learn their secret. Even more tragically, because they share so much of what makes us human, we will never understand ourselves
Vanessa Woods (Bonobo Handshake: A Memoir of Love and Adventure in the Congo, Ch. 35, Pg. 256)

Filed under bonobo chimpanzee humans humanity human evolution primate evolution primatology anthropology science vanessa woods Science